Public Health Inspection

Radon

Radon Testing

Your home affects your health. If your home has radon gas, you may be at increased risk of lung cancer.   You cannot smell or taste radon. The only way to know if your basement has a high level of radon is to have it tested.   If you spend a lot of time in your basement, consider doing a radon test.  The best time to test is between September and April.

Payment is required in order to receive the test kit.  Call 1-866 450-0000 to order your radon test kit.

Certified Radon Contractors

Swift Plumbing & Heating

1170 Chaplin St. W.

Swift Current, SK, S9H 0G8

Tel: 306-778-2830

kevin@swiftplumbing.net

 

Sun Ridge Residential Inc.

2308 Arlington Avenue

Saskatoon, SK S7J 3L3

Tel: 306-665-2525 (Saskatoon & Area)

info@sunridgegroup.ca

 

Canada Radon – North Battleford

2496 Hamelin St.

North Battleford, SK S9A 3R8

Tel: 306-500-4973

www.canadaradon.com

 

Master Radon – Regina

1379 Chatwin Crescent

Regina, SK S4N 7N8

Tel: 306-552-6773

fkirkpatrick@accesscomm.ca

Radon Reduction

Steps to reduce high levels of radon are recommended only if the occupants of the home spend 4 hours or more per day in the basement

If the level of radon in your house is slightly elevated, you may be able to modify the air exchange rate through your heat recovery ventilation system.

If you have a very high result, additional action will be necessary.

Weeping tile is a good collector of radon gas when the soil is dry. You can use your weeping tile to prevent radon from entering your house. With this solution, the sump pit is sealed with heavy gauge plastic and caulking, or with a sealed lid on the sump pit.   A pipe is installed from the sealed sump pit in the basement through an outside wall with a small fan attached. The fan draws the radon gas from the weeping tile around the house to the outside before it can enter your home. This system can reduce the radon level in a home by over 90%. It is recommended that you hire a certified radon mitigation contractor to perform this work. Contact your Public Health Inspector for advice and referrals.

If you do not have a sump pump, you can cut a hole in the concrete floor, remove some soil beneath the hole and fill the hole with crushed rock. Install a pipe in the rock with a fan that exhausts the radon to the outside. Seal the hole around the pipe. It is recommended that you hire a certified radon mitigation contractor to perform this work. Contact your Public Health Inspector for advice and referrals.

If you have a crawl space, concrete block walls or cracked basement walls or floors, you can cover the floor and walls with plastic sheeting and exhaust this space. If your basement has cracked in the past, it is likely that it will continue to do so in the future. In general, sealing basement cracks is not enough to lower high radon levels. It is recommended that you hire a certified radon mitigation contractor to perform this work. Contact your Public Health Inspector for advice and referrals.

Swift Plumbing & Heating

1170 Chaplin St. W.

Swift Current, SK, S9H 0G8

Tel: 306-778-2830

kevin@swiftplumbing.net

 

Sun Ridge Residential Inc.

2308 Arlington Avenue

Saskatoon, SK S7J 3L3

Tel: 306-665-2525 (Saskatoon & Area)

info@sunridgegroup.ca

 

Canada Radon – North Battleford

2496 Hamelin St.

North Battleford, SK S9A 3R8

Tel: 306-500-4973

www.canadaradon.com

 

Master Radon – Regina

1379 Chatwin Crescent

Regina, SK S4N 7N8

Tel: 306-552-6773

fkirkpatrick@accesscomm.ca

Safe Food

Program Overview

The purpose of the food safety program is to reduce the risk and prevent food borne illness. Public Health Inspectors educate and advise food facilities, investigate complaints and disease outbreaks and conduct safe food handling training. The Food Safety Regulations, the Public Eating Establishment Standards and The Sanitation Regulations apply to food service in Heartland Health Region. Public Health Inspectors are responsible for food safety at:

Restaurants, Delis, Caterers, Coffee Shops, Meat Processors, Slaughterhouses, Food Processors, Bake Shops/Bakeries, Grocery Stores, Convenience Stores, Liquor Outlets and Temporary Food Events.

Food Safety Regulations

Public Eating Establishment Standard

The Sanitation Regulations

Saskatchewan Food Processing Facility Best Management Practices

Safe Food Handling Course

Heartland Health Region‘s Public Health Inspection program provides face to face and online food handler courses. It is recommended that all food handlers attend a food handling course and recertify their training every 5 years.  Online Safe Food Handler courses are available by request.

 

Safe Food Handler Course Schedule                                Request for Online Food Handler Course

Food Processing

Under The Food Safety Regulations, The Milk Pasteurization Regulations and The Sanitation Regulations, health regions inspect public eating establishments, milk pasteurization plants and food processing facilities, including slaughterhouses.

Individuals wishing to process food in their private home for retail sale to the public may have difficulty meeting the regulated requirements because the family setting, physical structure and types of environment do not lend themselves to commercial processing. For example, children and pets may contaminate food, household fridges and ranges can only accommodate small volumes and the necessary plumbing fixtures for hand washing or equipment washing is usually inadequate. As well, family members who are ill or convalescing at home may be a source of contamination of the food being sold.

Health regions may approve the sale of home prepared food if the food processing area, storage areas and washing facilities are contained in an area completely separate from the rest of the residence. The Food Safety Regulations will apply to this setting. Low risk processed foods prepared in private kitchens, may be sold through local farmers’ markets. Processors are encouraged to contact their public health officer regarding regulations and guidelines applicable to food sales at farmers’ markets.

 

 

Food Processing Facility Best Management Practices

Food Recalls

Opening a Restaurant

Prior to opening or renovating a food facility, contact your public health inspector. You will need to submit the premise application form, a proposed floor plan and a proposed menu to your inspector for approval, prior to construction and operation. Once the plan is approved, construction can proceed. An inspection by the public health inspector is required prior to opening. A Public Eating Establishment License will be issued, once the inspection is completed, and all requirements of The Food Safety Regulations and The Public Eating Establishment Standards are met.

 

Application to Open a Public Eating Establishment          Guide to Opening a Restaurant          Food Safety Regulations          Public Eating Establishment Standard

Restaurant Inspections Online

Temporary Food Events

Food service events in Temporary Settings are non-permanent, short-term food service events.

You do not need a license when you serve food only to family, friends, co-workers or club members at private potluck suppers, team wind-up events, workplace parties, weddings, anniversaries or birthdays.

Community Organizations, including community associations, service clubs, multicultural associations, church groups, schools, sports teams and recreational clubs are exempted from the licensing requirements of The Food Safety Regulations when serving the foods listed below:

hot dogs;

  • hamburgers and smokies;
  • pre-packaged foods; and/or
  • non-potentially hazardous food.

Open the link below to learn more about safe food service.

Temporary Food Event Guidelines for Community Groups June 23 2016

Contact a Public Health Inspector in your area to find out if you need a license.  Select the link below for further information and when necessa

Events in which food is served to the public, including temporary events, may  require licensing to serve or sell food to the public. Saskatchewan’s The Food Safety Regulations apply whenever and wherever food or drink is prepared, served or sold to the public.

Open the link below to learn more about safe food service for licenced temporary events

HHRA Temporary Event Guidelines Operational Requirements June 23 2016

Application Form:

Temporary Food Service Event Form TG 174

Form for large events only:

Event Organizer Form TG 174

Private Water

Program Overview

The purpose of the private water program is to reduce the risk of and prevent illness and chronic disease in people who use their own well water. Public health inspectors educate and advise people about well water quality issues. We also provide advice on the type of water treatment system that is appropriate for your needs. Information on cleaning cisterns and water coolers is also available.

 

Rural Water Pipeline Connections & Cisterns

The purpose of inspecting the rural water pipeline connection is to prevent any cross-connections in your rural residence from contaminating the pipeline. Public Health Inspectors will inspect the check valve assembly and air gap between the water line and your cistern. All rural households require an inspection and completed permit prior to receiving water from the pipeline utility.

 

It is recommended that you use a cistern in your basement that is 700 to 1500 litres or 150 to 300 gallons in size for your household needs. The chlorine in the water will dissipate quickly. When water is stored for a long period of time, the quality of the water deteriorates and may become unsafe to drink.

 

Rural Water Pipeline Permit Application                Rural Water Pipeline Connections Questions and Answers

Water Sampling

It is recommended that you take at least one bacteriological sample per year for a private well. Samples for Chemicals and Health & Toxicity should be done for every private well at least once

 

Water samples can be dropped off at Rosetown Community Health Services Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday before noon. Contact 306-882-2672 Ext 3, Option 3 for water bottles and forms

 

Contact your local public health office for other sample drop off locations.

 

 

 

 

Water Treatment

Treatment options are available for wells to ensure that the water is safe to drink.

 

Water Treatment Information-For Shallow Wells

Well Maintenance

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Cistern Cleaning & Chlorine Monitoring

Cleaning and sanitizing of a cistern should be done once a year, or after any repairs or flooding.

 

Cistern Cleaning Procedure:

1. Drain the cistern

2. Wash the interior of the cistern with a pressure washer or a brush

3. Rinse inside surfaces with a pressure washer or sponge

4. Remove remaining water and sludge using a wet-dry vacuum

 

Cistern Sanitizing Procedure:

1. Add chlorine while it is being filled.  Use 0.5 litres of household bleach for every 1000 gallons of water

2. Open your household taps one by one until you smell chlorine then shut the tap

3. Let the chlorine mixture sit for at least 6 hours

4. Drain the cistern.  Direct the chlorinated water to an area away from vegetation to avoid damage.  Do not drain the chlorinated water into a fish bearing water source. Do not direct the chlorinated water to a septic tank or mound

 

Check the concentration of chlorine in your cistern weekly.  You should have at least 1.0 mg/L total chlorine and 0.2 mg/L free chlorine.

To maintain a chlorine residual in your cistern, add about 20 mL of 5 percent bleach for each 1,000 L of stored water (about 2 ounces of bleach for each 1,000 Imperial gallons). The entire water volume of the cistern should be thoroughly mixed and not used for at least 20 minutes.

 

Please be advised that chlorine does not effectively destroy some parasites.  If you are hauling water from a dugout or shallow well, additional treatment will be required.

Public Water

Program Overview

The purpose of the public water program is to reduce the risk of and prevent illness and chronic disease in people who use public water supplies. Consultation and regulation of public water in Saskatchewan is shared by the Water Security Agency and the Ministry of Health Public Health Inspectors are responsible for water quality at water systems that have a flow of less than 18,000 litres per day

Health Hazard Regulations               Cryptosporidium & Giardia

Bulk Water Haulers

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Drinking Water Advisory Information

Water Sampling

Water samples can be dropped off at Rosetown Community Health Services Monday and Tuesday before noon. Contact 882-2672 Ext 3, Option 3 for water bottles and forms.

 

Water Treatment

Treatment options are available for well, cistern & dugout water to ensure that the water is safe to drink.

 

Ultraviolet Light              Water Treament for Sandpoint and Shallow Wells

Onsite Sewage Systems

Program Overview

A properly constructed sewage disposal system ensures that wastewater is effectively treated. It is important to protect our families, neighbors, water supplies and the environment from health hazards that can arise from improperly treated sewage. Public health inspectors provide a variety of services related to sewage under The Private Sewage Works Regulations.   Effective October 1, 2011, the regulations governing sewage have changed. The Public Health Inspection program provides the following services:

 

– Contractor and homeowner education

– Plan review, input and approvals

– Issuance and approval of permits

– Site inspections and final approvals of completed systems

Choosing a Sewage System

Sewage Permits

Application to Construct Private Sewage System

 

Effective May 1 2015, the way in which our office processes applications, payments and inspections will change. This is to align with our new provincial data management system and to improve the financial management of our program. Completed applications with payment will be required in advance of all sewage inspections. Payments will be accepted by credit card or cheque.

 

The process for sewage permit application, approval and inspections will be as follows:

 

Step 1:             Submit application and payment to:

 

Heartland Health Region

Rosetown Community Services

Box 1300 Rosetown, S0L 2V0

Fax: 306-882-6474

E-mail: public.health@hrha.sk.ca

 

Step 2:           Public Health Inspector reviews the application.

  1. Accepted applications – Contractor will receive a permit number.
  2. Rejected applications – Contractor will have application returned for resubmission.

 

Step 3:            Contractor contacts the district inspector for an inspection. To book an inspection, the permit number and location must be provided. Contractors must give at minimum 5 business days’ notice to arrange an inspection time. You may not schedule an inspection prior to permit approval and payment.

 

Step 4:            Once the sewage works is inspected and approved, the district inspector issues the completed permit to the applicant.

 

Please note:

  • Permit applications are required for all sewage works, including but not limited to new construction and any alterations to existing sewage works.
  • Applications may be submitted with the Credit Card Payment Authorization Form attached.
  • Sewage permits expire when there is no request for inspection within 6 months from the date of issue or the date of initial inspection. Notifications will be sent to applicants when permits expire.
  • When major deficiencies are encountered, a letter documenting the issues will be sent to the contractor. Contractors will not be able to book further inspections until the deficiencies are resolved.
  • Major/significant deficiencies requiring a re-inspection may be subject to additional fees.

Subdivisions

A Step by Step Guide to Subdivisions

 

Public health inspectors receive referrals for new subdivision applications from the Community Planning Branch of Ministry of Government Relations. Public health inspectors review the existing and proposed water and sewage systems on proposed subdivisions. After the review is complete, public health inspectors provide comments to Government Relations. Ministry of Government Relations will then reach a decision if they should approve or reject a proposed subdivision.

 

In general, public health inspectors will consider on subdivision referrals:

 

the water source

the type of sewage system

the size and location of the proposed parcel

the surrounding land uses

the distance of the sewage system from

all property boundaries

the dwelling(s) on the ¼ section

any existing wells or cisterns on the ¼ section

any dugout/watercourse/ravine

Please note that surface discharge systems and lagoons are not allowed on a parcel of land that is less than 10 acres in size.

 

In general, for a jet disposal/open discharge system, the following set-back distances apply:

Building                         60 m (200 ft)

City, Town, or Village 1 km (0.6 mile)

Recreation Areas         60 m (200 ft)

Property Boundary         60 m (200 ft)

Cut or embankment       30 m (100 ft)

Ground water table       1.5 m ( 5 ft)

Water Course or Well             45 m (150 ft)

New subdivision applications can be processed quickly if all of the required information and details are received with the application and plan.

Public Accommodation & Housing

Program Overview

The purpose the public accommodation and housing program is to reduce the risk and prevent illness and injury from public accommodations and housing.

Bed Bugs

 

Public Health Inspectors can assist you in identifying if you have a bed bug issue, and provide referrals to licenced pest control operators.  Public Health Inspectors do not provide pest control services.

 

Bed Bug Information

Hantavirus

Indoor Air Quality

The purpose of the indoor air quality program is to reduce the risk and prevent acute illness and chronic disease from indoor air contaminants. Public health inspectors provide consultation to homeowners and the public regarding indoor air quality. Public health inspectors provide recommendations regarding indoor air quality to the public, and assess indoor air quality in arenas every two years

 

Public health inspectors provide information to homeowners that are concerned with indoor air quality, radon, mould, carbon monoxide. We can conduct indoor air quality assessments, but do not provide free testing services

 

Itinerant Use Accommodations (Usually a Stay for Less than 30 Days)

Itinerant Use Accommodations (Usually a Stay for Less than 30 Days)

Public Health Inspectors administer The Public Accommodation Regulations and The Itinerant Use Accommodation Standards. Using this legislation, Public Health Inspectors inspect, educate and advise licenced accommodations and investigate complaints. Regular inspections are conducted for hotels, motels, apartment hotels, vacation farms, bed and breakfasts, campgrounds, recreational camps, rental cabins and hunting and fishing lodges.

If you are renovating or building a new Itinerant Use Accommodation, a written plan needs to be submitted to this office for approval prior to construction and operation. Contact your local public health inspector for more information.

 

Private Dwellings

Public Health Inspectors provide consultation and inspection services for owners of private dwellings under The Public Health Act, 1994.

Inspectors follow up on complaints/concerns for issues such as lack of heat, lack of water, lack of repair, sewage back-ups, hoarding, absence of plumbing or other utilities, structural damage, mould, water infiltration and  infestation of pests including bedbugs, cockroaches, rodents. Corrective actions can range from a report highlighting the fixes needed to condemnation of the dwelling.

Public Health Inspectors provide consultation and information on issues such as radon, mould, asbestos and other indoor air quality issues.

 

Radon Reduction

Steps to reduce high levels of radon are recommended only if the occupants of the home spend 4 hours or more per day in the basement.

 

If the level of radon in your house is slightly elevated, you may be able to modify the air exchange rate through your heat recovery ventilation system.

If you have a very high result, additional action will be necessary.

 

Weeping tile is a good collector of radon gas when the soil is dry. You can use your weeping tile to prevent radon from entering your house. With this solution, the sump pit is sealed with heavy gauge plastic and caulking, or with a sealed lid on the sump pit.   A pipe is installed from the sealed sump pit in the basement through an outside wall with a small fan attached. The fan draws the radon gas from the weeping tile around the house to the outside before it can enter your home. This system can reduce the radon level in a home by over 90%. It is recommended that you hire a certified radon mitigation contractor to perform this work. Contact your Public Health Inspector for advice and referrals.

 

If you do not have a sump pump, you can cut a hole in the concrete floor, remove some soil beneath the hole and fill the hole with crushed rock. Install a pipe in the rock with a fan that exhausts the radon to the outside. Seal the hole around the pipe. It is recommended that you hire a certified radon mitigation contractor to perform this work. Contact your Public Health Inspector for advice and referrals.

 

If you have a crawl space, concrete block walls or cracked basement walls or floors, you can cover the floor and walls with plastic sheeting and exhaust this space. If your basement has cracked in the past, it is likely that it will continue to do so in the future. In general, sealing basement cracks is not enough to lower high radon levels. It is recommended that you hire a certified radon mitigation contractor to perform this work. Contact your Public Health Inspector for advice and referrals.

Radon Testing

Your home affects your health. If your home has radon gas, you may be at increased risk of lung cancer.   You cannot smell or taste radon. The only way to know if your basement has a high level of radon is to have it tested.   If you spend a lot of time in your basement, consider doing a radon test.  The best time to test is between September and April.

 

Payment is required in order to receive the test kit.  Call 1-866 450-0000 to order your radon test kit.

Rental Housing

Public Health Inspectors provide consultation and inspection services for rental accommodations to both tenants and landlords. Inspectors follow up on complaints for issues such as lack of heat, lack of water, lack of repair, sewage back-ups, hoarding, absence of plumbing or other utilities, structural damage, mould, water infiltration and infestation of pests including bedbugs, cockroaches, rodents. Corrective actions can range from a report highlighting the fixes needed to condemnation of the dwelling.

Public Health Inspectors provide consultation and information on issues such as radon, mould, asbestos and other indoor air quality issues.

Prior to an inspector conducting an inspection of a rental accommodation, the complainant will be asked to notify the other party of the issue in writing and provide proof that the request to have the issue resolved has not been addressed.

Disputes between a landlord and tenant are handled by the Office of the Residential Tenancies. Contact information can be found at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/government-structure/boards-commissions-and-agencies/office-of-residential-tenancies

 

Office of Residential Tenancies

Housing Handbook

Public Health Act, 1994

 

Swimming Pools & Recreational Water

Program Overview

The purpose of the swimming pool program is to reduce the risk and prevent illness and injury to the public at swimming pools, whirlpools and waterslides. Public health inspectors educate and advise pool operators, investigate complaints, investigate injuries and disease outbreaks, and conduct pool operator training. Public health inspectors are also responsible for reviewing safety plans for public pools to ensure that the plans protect the public. The Swimming Pool Regulations, 1999, the Swimming Pool Design and Operational Standards and the Whirlpool Design and Operational Standards apply to public pools in Heartland Health Region Public Health Inspectors are responsible for swimmer safety at: swimming pools, paddling pools, wave pools, whirlpools, water slides, diving boards, play equipment, and pool slides

Prior to opening or renovating a swimming pool, contact your public health inspector. You will need to submit a written plan, prepared by a professional engineer or architect to your inspector for approval, prior to construction and operation. Contact your public health inspector for more information. Opening a Swimming Pool Once the plan is approved, construction can proceed. An inspection by the public health inspector is required prior to opening. A licence will be issued after the plan approval and inspection meet the requirements.

 

Swimming Pool Regulations, 1999

Swimming Pool Standards

Whirlpool Standards

 

Pool Operator's' Courses

Public Health Inspectors from Heartland Health region administer The Saskatchewan Swimming Pool Regulations, 1999. These regulations require that each person handling pool chemicals must attend a recognized Pool Operator’s training course. Each swimming pool is required to have at minimum one staff member who has completed the Pool Operators course. It is strongly recommended that operators recertify every five to ten years The training course is schedule is completed in the Spring and is held in May. Two courses are normally held. The fee for this training course is $60.00 per person. This payment also covers the cost of the training manual. For further information about the swimming pool course contract Heartland Health Region at (306) 882 2672 Option 3, Ext 3, or e-mail public.health@hrha.sk.ca

 

Swimming Pool Operator Course

 

Plumbing

Program Overview

All plumbing installations require a permit be obtained from Heartland Health Region prior installing plumbing works. This includes commercial buildings, residential dwellings and farmhouses. All plumbing work is to be done by a Journeyman Plumber. Homeowners may be able to do their own plumbing if their plumbing system will not be connected to a communal water system. For plumbing permits in towns and villages, your contractor may take out the permit at the town office and call your inspector to schedule an inspection For rural inspections, submit the permit application to your inspector 5 days in advance of the inspection. Permits are not required when changing fixtures (toilets, sinks etc.) but do apply when building a new system, and when changing vent or drainage piping.

Link to important information regarding the Adoption of the 2015 NPC and increase in permit fees.

Plumbing Code and Fee Revisions Effective June 14, 2017

 

Plumbing Permits

Rural Plumbing Permit Application.

 

Effective May 1, 2015, the way in which our office processes applications, payments and inspections will change. This is to align with our new provincial data management system and to improve the financial management of our program. Completed applications with payment will be required in advance of all plumbing inspections. Payments will be accepted by credit card or cheque.

 

Rural Plumbing Permit Process

 

The process for rural plumbing permit application, approval and inspection will be as follows:

 

Step 1:             Submit application and payment to:

 

Heartland Health Region

Rosetown Community Services

Box 1300 Rosetown, S0L 2V0

Fax: 306-882-6474

E-mail: public.health@hrha.sk.ca

 

Step 2:           Public Health Inspector reviews the application.

  1. Accepted applications – Contractor will receive a permit number.
  2. Rejected applications – Contractor will have application returned for resubmission.

Step 3:            Contractor contacts the district inspector to book an inspection. The permit number and location must be provided during booking. Contractors must give at minimum 5 business days’ notice for inspections. You may not schedule an inspection prior to permit approval and payment.

Step 4:            Once the plumbing works is inspected and approved, the district inspector issues the completed permit to the contractor.

 

Urban Plumbing Permit Process

Plumbing permits are available at the following communities:   Davidson, Kenaston, Outlook, Lucky Lake, Dinsmore, Loreburn, Beechy, Kyle, Elrose, Rosetown, Biggar, Perdue, Kinley, Landis, Unity, Macklin, Kerrobert, Luseland, Denzil, Dodsland, Coleville, Wilkie, Kindersley, Eston, Eatonia, and Plenty.

  • Permit application are required for all plumbing works, including but not limited to: new construction, alterations to existing plumbing, and extensions.
  • Applications may be submitted with the Credit Card Payment Authorization Form attached.
  • Plumbing permits expire when there is no request for inspection within 6 months from the date of issue or the date of initial inspection. Notifications will be sent to contractors when permits expire.
  • When major deficiencies are encountered, a letter documenting the issues will be sent to the contractor. Contractors will not be able to book further inspections until the deficiencies are resolved.
  • Major/significant deficiencies requiring a re-inspection may be subject to additional fees.

Rural Water Pipelines

Rural Water Pipeline Permit Application               Rural Water Pipeline Connections Questions and Answers

 

The purpose of inspecting the rural water pipeline connection is to prevent any cross-connections in your rural residence from contaminating the pipeline. Public Health Inspectors will inspect the check valve assembly and air gap between the water line and your cistern. All rural households require an inspection and completed permit prior to receiving water from the pipeline utility.

Safe Personal Services

Program Overview

 

The purposed of the personal service program is to prevent the spread of communicable disease to the public through personal service procedures. Public health inspectors investigate invasive personal services on an ongoing basis, and non-invasive personal services on a complaint basis.

 

Invasive personal services include the following:

Tattooing

Body and ear piercing

Electrolysis

 

Non-invasive personal services include the following:

Hairstyling

Manicures

Pedicures

Tanning

Most esthetic services

 

Personal services facilities are regulated under The Public Health Act, 1994, and section 13 of The Health Hazard Regulations.

 

 Public Health Act, 1994               Health Hazard Regulations               Saskatchewan Personal Service Facility Best Management Practices

 

 

 

Opening a Personal Service Facility

Tobacco Control

Program Overview

Heartland Health Region’s goal is to reduce the number of deaths due to tobacco and protect residents from second-hand smoke. Public health inspectors in Saskatchewan are designated to enforce The Tobacco Control Act and The Tobacco Control Regulations. The goal of this legislation is to reduce youth access to tobacco products and protect Saskatchewan residents from the harms associated with environmental tobacco smoke. The Act was first put into place in 2002 and has since been amended, most significantly in 2005 and 2010. Laws within The Tobacco Control Act include a ban on smoking in enclosed public places, in cars with children under the age of 16 present, around doorways, windows and air intakes of public buildings and on school grounds. In addition, there are a number of restrictions on the sale and advertising of tobacco products.

Enclosed Public Places

On January 01, 2005 The Tobacco Control Act, was amended to exclude all smoking in all enclosed public places. The Tobacco Control Act defines “enclosed public place” as:

“all or any part of a building or other enclosed public place on conveyance to which the public has access as of right or by express or implied invitation”.

 

This includes outdoor bus shelters, public buildings rented for private events, private clubs, bars, restaurants, billiard halls, bingo halls, taxis, bowling centres, casinos, restaurants, and retail stores.

Smoke Free Public Places

As of August 15, 2010, tobacco use is no longer permitted in schools (K to 12) and on school grounds. This includes both smoked and smokeless tobacco products (i.e. cigarettes, chew, snuff, etc) but does not apply to the sacred or ceremonial use of tobacco. Once students, staff, or visitors enter the school grounds, they can no longer smoke, use tobacco, or hold lighted tobacco, at any time, day or night, whether or not school is in session.

 

The following tobacco control legislation came into effect on October 1st, 2010

 

Prohibit smoking in vehicles when children under the age of 16 are present

Prohibit smoking in the enclosed common areas of multi-unit residential dwellings;

Prohibit smoking within 3 metres of all doorways, windows and air intakes of enclosed public places

 

Sale of Tobacco

Public Health Inspectors also deal with concerns regarding the Sales of Tobacco, including the sale of tobacco products to persons under 18 years old. If you have questions about interpretation of The Tobacco Control Act and The Tobacco Control Regulations, or concerns about Tobaccos sales to youth, please contact your local public health inspector.

 

Sale of Tobacco Products Information

 

Communicable Disease & Animal Bite Investigations

Program Overview

The purpose of the Communicable Disease and Animal Bite program is to prevent the spread of communicable diseases and rabies through the administration of The Disease Control Regulations.

Communicable Disease Information

Public Health Inspectors follow up on any case or community outbreak of a Category 1 communicable disease and provide education and consultation services to those affected by these diseases. Inspectors will follow up on suspected outbreaks or when there is a laboratory confirmed communicable disease.

Follow up for an outbreak can include an investigation of a suspected outbreak complete with interviews of people who are infected with a communicable disease or who have an association with a suspected outbreak. This might also include specimen collection.

For single cases of communicable diseases, inspectors will perform a follow up interview with the person affected to try and determine the source, find out if there are other cases and will provide information on how to avoid contracting the communicable disease in the future.

 

Salmonella Fact Sheet               E. coli Fact Sheet               Camplyobacteriosis Fact Sheet               Cryptosporidium & Giardia Fact Sheet               Norovirus Fact Sheet

 

Animal Bite Information

All animal bites are reportable in Saskatchewan as per The Disease Control Regulations in an effort to reduce or eliminate the risk of rabies transmission from animals to humans. When a bite is reported to a Public Health Inspector, follow up is conducted with the person bitten and with the owner of the animal involved (except where the animal is wild) in an effort to rule out the possibility of rabies.

Inspectors will want to know the animals vaccination status, the events leading up to the bite, if the animal was healthy at the time of the bite, if the animal is an indoor pet, outdoor pet, farm animal or wild animal and if the animal is still alive and if so can it be observed.

If the animal is a pet or farm animal, it is best to keep the animal quarantined (where possible) for observation for 10 days. It is strongly recommended that an animal not be put down at least until after the 10 day observation period. If an animal is still alive and healthy at the end of the observation period, then it will be known that the animal did not have rabies virus in the saliva at the time of the bite and this will avoid having to administer Rabies Immune Globulin (RIG).

If the animal is wild and cannot be obtained for observation or testing, a risk assessment, based on the interview with the inspector will be done by the Medical Health Officer to determine if RIG should be administered.

If the animal has died or been killed and the head is still in reasonably good shape, then the head may be sent in for rabies testing.

Contact Information & Map

Find My Public Health Officer

Public Health Officer Area Map

 

Rosetown and Area Public Health Officer

Kevin Kapell

Ph: 882-2672 ext. 2288

Fax: 882-6474

kevin.kapell@hrha.sk.ca

 

Kindersley and Area Public Health Officer

John Prince

Ph: 463-1000 ext. 2535

Fax: 463-4550

john.prince@hrha.sk.ca

 

Outlook and Area Public Health Officer

Vanessa Amy

Ph: 867-8676 ext. 406

Fax: 867-2069

vanessa.amy@hrha.sk.ca

 

Unity and Area Public Health Officer

On leave

Ph: 228-2666 ext. 2769

Fax: 882-6474

jim.webster@hrha.sk.ca

 

Jim Webster

Senior Public Health Inspector

Ph: 948-3323 ext. 2769

Fax: 948-2011

jim.webster@hrha.sk.ca

 

General Information

General Reception

306-882-2672 ext. 3 option 3

public.health@hrha.sk.ca

The objective of the Public Health Inspection program is to prevent injury and illness by reducing physical, chemical and biological hazards.  Public Health Inspectors assess, manage and communicate health risks to the public.  This is achieved through education, inspections, investigations and enforcement of The Public Health Act, 1994.
Privacy Policy

Protecting the privacy of your personal health information is important to the Cypress Health Region (the “Region”).

 

The Region will only collect, use and disclose your personal health information:

1. When:

2. As required or authorized by law.

The Region will not otherwise collect, use or disclose your personal health information unless we have your consent.

 

The Region strives to keep its’ employees, physicians and affiliates aware of your privacy rights by offering education and having in place policies and procedures designed to protect the integrity, security and confidentiality of your personal health information. This includes a policy restricting access to your personal health information by only those who have a need to know for an authorized purpose.

 

If you wish to obtain further information about the Region’s privacy policies and your privacy rights, we encourage you to visit our privacy page or contact our Privacy Officer at (306) 778-5169 or 1-888-461-7443.  You may also wish to contact the provincial Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner at 1-877-748-2298 or visit them at their website.

 

This website uses Google Analtyics technology to improve content and monitor activity.  For more information on how Google collects and processes data please view Google’s Privacy and Terms.

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Links

Links to the websites below are provided for the information and convenience of visitors to this site.

The Cypress Health Region does not assume responsibility for the accuracy of content of other sites, which are linked here. We strongly suggest that the best source of medical information is your personal or family physician.

3S Health

Accreditation Canada

Asbestos Registry

The Arthritis Society

Canadian Cancer Society

Canadian Diabetes Association

Canadian Institute for Health Information

Choose Wisely Canada

Dr. Noble Irwin Regional Healthcare Foundation Inc.

Health Canada

Health Canada Kids

Health Card Application

Health Quality Council (HQC)

Heart and Stroke Foundation

MedSask

Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Saskatchewan

Parent Mentoring Program of Saskatchewan

Patient Safety Institute

Resources for Nurses

Saskatchewan Health

Society for Progressive Supranuclear Paisy

Saskatchewan Surigcal Care Network

Sites of Professional Associations:

Physician Recruitment Agency of Saskatchewan

Canadian Dietetic Association

Canadian Society of Medical Laboratory Service

Registered Psychiatric Nurses Association of Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Association of Licensed Practical Nurses

Saskatchewan Association of Medical Radiation Technologists

Saskatchewan Association of Speech/Language Pathologists and Audiologists

Saskatchewan Association of Social Workers

Saskatchewan College of Physical Therapy

Saskatchewan Dental Therapists Association

Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Association

Saskatchewan Society of Occupational Therapists

Swift Current Newcomer Welcome Centre

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Well Wishes
To send your Well Wishes to a patient or resident in a Heartland Health Region facility please complete the information below.
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